Group Facilitators Create Results by Encouraging Attendee Participation

Getting a group of people to work together with the purpose of achieving a common goal is often an obstacle for businesses. Facilitators may be incorporated into a workshop as a way to encourage positive participation in the workplace. Group facilitators help all participants with applying practical skills, problem resolution, and productivity issues. When the goal of a session is to put all these items to better use in future team collaborations, the process is commonly called a facilitated workshop. These sessions are advantageous any time a business is attempting to manage organizational changes.

A facilitation expert is included to remove existing barriers and to assist with goal achievement. Workshops help employees become motivated and create interaction that promotes a productive environment. Working relationships are improved due to the sense of belonging these professionals provide during the process. Many techniques are used throughout the building session to ensure it is a success.

How Do Facilitator Techniques Increase Collaboration?

The techniques applied by facilitators are an attempt to encourage each individual to constructively participate along with the rest of the group. A professional will first identify the objectives to be accomplished through the workshop. Flexibility is important in regards to participant schedules and goal achievement. If the facilitator is too focused on time or rushes into deliberations too quickly, less successful results will follow throughout the session.

Games are a common tool used before a meeting commences because it removes tension from the atmosphere. When individuals have to work together to win a game, they often have an easier time opening up and becoming comfortable around each other. These little breathers also promote teamwork, communication, and compromise.

Complex problem solving where the resolution is broken down into small pieces may be another used technique. Facilitators present the problem on a large scale and then break it into smaller manageable components. A section of the problem is assigned to each group so they can come up with a solution. By removing the intimidation of a big issue, the entire team is able to solve the complex problem. Some participants are not as willing to take part in the workshop. A facilitator typically identifies social unrest to provide additional encouragement to contribute to the group.

Visual tools are another tactic used during the facilitation process. Participant numbers are often limited to ten people because this count ensures all attendees are involved. Techniques vary based on the personal style of the professional and the overall objective of the workshop.

Group facilitatorsmust be self-aware, friendly, communicative, and open to provide needed results. Any business can set up a workshop to improve team work or decision making abilities. Some services provide a program for this type of facilitation designed to include one or many series of workshops. A company can also set up their own event and locate a facilitator to assist with developing a team building or staff enhancement session. Businesses often find these processes to be more rewarding when a qualified professional is used. With a little research, any type of collaborative session should be a success.

Presentation Skills: Be More Productive Using a Facilitator Mode

There are many definitions for presentations. When you present there are also many different modes you can focus on. Are you a facilitator or an educator? The mode of facilitator is often misused in the corporate world and interchanged with words like trainer and educator. Facilitation is an exceptional skill, once you learn this skill you can boost your productivity and it can make you a better presenter.

A true facilitator is all about creating an environment where people feel safe and able to share their ideas freely. I believe the facilitator’s role is to act as a conduit. The first process a facilitator will undertake is to create operating agreements with their audience. It is the facilitator’s role to remove any blockages and conflicts within the group. They allow the thought processes of the group to be processed and expressed. They are responsible for establishing an environment that does that.

If this is a mode you are interested in developing yourself, the main proficiencies for this mode include:

Removing personal agenda – a facilitator’s role is to set the agenda with the group, not be running their own personal agenda. It is more powerful to seek to fill the agenda of the team and you will be more engaging to your audience.

Creating trust – this can be established in many ways for a presenter. It can occur before the presentation with communications circulated to the attendees, it can be built into the introduction for the facilitator and it can also be established when the agenda is set.

Respecting diversity – valuing each person’s input and recognising the variety of expertise and experience within the audience is the sign of a great facilitator.

Having active listening skills – one of the most important skill for any facilitator is the need to be able to listen and process what the audience is saying … and quickly. Listening intently will assist this.

A good facilitator may take several hours or days to create an environment where all the work may finally come together in the last hour. Don’t be fooled … some may think a facilitator comes into a presentation or meeting unprepared but that is not the case. An exceptional facilitator spends time preparing by taking a comprehensive brief from the client, researching the group/audience they will be working with and determining the questions that need to be asked to facilitate the best environment.

A quick note: Many organisations choose to bring in external facilitators to work with teams to achieve objectives. An external facilitator is neutral, doesn’t participate in office politics and is not influenced by the management hierarchy. If you team is grid locked or not co-operating, an external facilitator can be a great solution for you.

In a true facilitation style you may not even have the first question for your audience! Every discussion is a question i.e. does this feel right for you? Every facilitator should have an arsenal of great questions in their tool kit. Those questions include:

How is that working for you?

How do you feel about that?

I’m having trouble understanding that?

Does anyone want to add anything to that?

What’s that a part of?

If you knew the answer to that, what would it be?

In your experience, is that correct?

Does that ring true for you?

What do you need to get more out of this?

So what else is coming up?

If you had more time, what would the answer be?

If you knew the answer, what would it look like?

What is the biggest problem with the world?

What is the biggest issue with the world?

Facilitators are able to hold the space in tension to understand. They don’t try to fill the silence. They are able to capture conversations, check people’s understanding and expose all opinions. Learning questioning techniques will increase your mastery of this mode.

Here is a Facilitation checklist for you to help build your skills in this mode ask yourself the following questions:

Do you have an arsenal of questions?

Are you an active listener?

Can you “hold the space” in the tension?

Can you continually ask questions rather than try and find solutions to the discussions?

When you master this facilitation mode you will become a more powerful and engaging presenter. This skill can assist you when you have a tough audience, when you need to change the environment and when you are helping a client find a solution.

Group Facilitation: What Factors Are Controlled to Nurture Efficiency?

A team of employees brought together to achieve a goal, resolve conflicts, or make important decisions is group facilitation. Facilitators are in charge of ensuring the productive flow of a meeting. They make certain the meeting flows, has an agenda, and keep the group on track and disrupt arguments by interjecting when necessary. This individual manages the discussion while remaining neutral to assist the participants in reaching an understandable and well-researched decision. A group facilitator is not the same as a team leader or company executive because their experience is given strictly in an objective manner to aid in the progress of the discussion. A facilitator is in charge of:

  • Keeping Everyone Focused
  • Unlocking Creativity or Expertise
  • Making Certain Items are Discussed Thoroughly
  • Helping the Participants Reach Better Decisions
  • Resolving Issues or Accomplishing Objectives

Facilitators have precise techniques that are designed to promote participation and positivity during the meeting. Telling individuals assigned to a group that they must do something does not automatically provide good results. Personalities have to be balanced in order to create an environment where ideas are pondered rather than rejected. Facilitators are trained to maintain the environment necessary to reach a productive outcome.

How Does a Group Facilitator Maintain the Right Atmosphere?

A group facilitator focuses on what can be done to help participants work together and reach a common goal. They guide the team through each agenda and monitor what goes on to put everyone’s skills to the best use. This addition allows a team to be highly successful and supplies improved results at a much faster pace. An effective organizer will have these qualities:

  • Flexibility
  • Adaptability
  • Proactive Nature
  • Responsiveness
  • Resilience

Group facilitation requires an individual to be capable of modifying activities prior to and during a session. They should be able to change activities based on the observed characteristics of participants. Experts remain neutral while taking steps to prevent extreme tensions or frustrations from affecting productivity.

Six tensions typically arise during a team-based meeting and can drastically affect progress if they are not handled correctly. The following tensions enhance a meeting when managed efficiently by a group facilitator:

  • Structure
  • Pace
  • Interaction
  • Focus
  • Concern
  • Control

The structure of a meeting can range from tight to loose in regards to how the rules are laid out. An extremely tight structure involves defining rules before the process starts whereas rules are defined as the discussion progresses in a loose meeting. Group facilitation experts manage the interaction between participants ranging from cooperative to competitive environments. Focus can be process driven, result driven, or remain neutral with concern ranging from a more individual approach to the group as a whole. A facilitator will take an unobtrusive role if a team must decide on what actions or objectives offer the most value. They sometimes take a neutral, consulting, leadership, or background role based on the objectives that need to be met. Professionals must be capable of balancing every tension to create the most productive atmosphere and guarantee positive results.

Meeting Facilitation: The Aspects of Becoming Successful

In business, facilitation refers to the successful running of a productive and impartial meeting, without leading or distracting the group from the main goal. Facilitators aid in meetings that involve a decision, finding a solution to a problem, and in the exchange of ideas for discussion.

Meetings are the perfect avenue to do find resolutions as they are where people come together to work on a common goal. Good and effective meetings include: a) one goal that everyone is familiar with. b) A plan to reach those goals. c) Understanding that everyone comes from different backgrounds, therefore, opinions and points of view will vary. d) A sense of responsibility and involvement with the company and one another.

One single and simple way to achieve a successful meeting does not exist. Building synergy usually comes with experience and cooperation from the group. The more people are aware of good group dynamics, the easier the job of the facilitator, and the more productive the end result.

Some of the aspects of facilitation include the following:

The role of the facilitator – Their task is likened to that of a mediator, who helps out in the process during a grievance, but not involved with what occurred before and what happens after. These are individuals who assist groups of people to effectively reach a goal and work diligently toward accomplishing that goal. They do not take sides or express their points of view, allowing the floor to discuss among themselves.

Consulting with the client – A third-party individual affiliated with another company may seek out the help of the facilitator. This usually involves business deals that include both companies to work together towards a common resolution. The facilitators will be able to understand the purpose and the best expected outcome.

Making arrangements – The meetings are to be arranged and managed by the facilitator. This involves the location to be approved by the participants and the acceptance of the invitation by those needed to be in attendance. This aspect involves researching for background information regarding why the meeting is being held in the first place.

Setting the agenda – In compliance with the previous aspect, this field also involves understanding in detail how each goal can be reached and how long it could take. With enough experience and practice, facilitators explain to the participants the issues and each possible course of action.

Understanding group norms and dynamics – Given that everyone comes from a different department, culture, and background, having enough knowledge on group dynamics can help the overall flow of the discussion and the productivity of the team. Facilitators should not make assumptions, but rather adapt to the differences. They should also be aware of the body language of each participant, and make sure everyone is comfortable.

All of these aspects make up sound and effective facilitation, with improvement noticeable in following meetings. At the conclusion of each gathering, everyone should have a sense of what to expect at the next showing. It is also critical for the facilitators to ask the group what they believe should happen next.